10th Honda Civic Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,587 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Consumer Reports's Talking Cars segment has recently posted a video review of the new Honda Civic and Lexus RX. They were brutal with the 9th gen Civic when comparing it to the 10th gen. :D

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Very interesting, especially the comments about Nissan's high level of owner dissatisfaction. I hope, and expect, Honda's CVTs to be better. Still, I am adopting a wait and see attitude wrt CVTs. As in, wait at least ten years, to see what sort of failure modes they show. To see if aftermarket servicing will be able to cope with them. Because afaict, they are still a replace-but-do-not-repair item. A great big red flag for me. Anyway, Honda's manual transmissions have a reputation of being great, so that's likely how I'll roll, when the time comes. Unless they put in the 8 spd DCT with torque convertor. That'd make choosing pretty tough for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
I hope, and expect, Honda's CVTs to be better. Still, I am adopting a wait and see attitude wrt CVTs. As in, wait at least ten years, to see what sort of failure modes they show.
What is your starting point for the 10 years? They have been selling CVT's since 2001 (Civic Hybrid).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Interesting question. Are the stresses that a CVT in Honda’s IMA system equivalent to the stresses that a CVT has to deal with when dealing with a gas engine alone? I’m (just guessing) that because some of the torque is provided by the electric motor, that a CVT in a Honda IMA machine has a bit of an easier life. Mind you, the electric motors in an IMA system were admittedly very wimpy, so...


Then again, there’s a 16 page thread on E****** entitled “Honda Civic Hybrid Transmission Problems”. Otoh, no doubt Honda has improved this particular CVT for the Civic, a very important product for Honda.


I guess what I am really waiting for is for the manufacturers and aftermarket transmission shops to start offering economically viable CVT overhauls, including periodic belt replacements. Like nobody blinks an eye at mfg recommended timing belt changes. But afaict, automotive CVT manufacturers will not repair failed CVTs, but only replace them. Once they start repairing them, at a mileage and cost comparable to conventional automatics, then I’ll start considering owning a car with one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Yeah, good point - the gas engine in the hybrids is pretty wimpy compared to the ones in the 10th gen.

I do my own repairs for the most part, but not on transmissions. It is a little disconcerting to think I wouldn't be able to take my car to my local transmission shop if it needed work. But I think I'd rather drive a newer car and risk having to buy a new transmission than drive an older car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
... But I think I'd rather drive a newer car and risk having to buy a new transmission than drive an older car.
What if you are (say) driving a 15 year old car worth $3000, with a failing CVT, which can't be repaired, but only replaced, and they want $4000 to do so. Keeping an eye on Nissan for this scenario to occur on a regular (?) basis.

But as I say, once CVTs are able to be overhauled cheaply and CVT belts are replaced routinely as wear items, this nightmare ends.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top