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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just had them installed by King Motorsports. No noticeable change in ride comfort, but the car feels better. There is less body roll when cornering and a lot less squat and dive under acceleration and hard braking. The steering in our civics is pretty quick, but with the OEM suspension I found myself turning the wheel, waiting for the weight to shift and the car to roll, and then correcting my steering. Now there is much less waiting and correcting, the car just goes where I point. Makes the car feel a lot lighter on its feet.

The Pro-kit doesn't make the car look slammed, but does close the fender gap nicely. I'll update with pics when I have a chance.

I had to navigate a couple steep-ish driveways on the way home, one a bit more quickly than I wanted, and the chin of my car remains unscraped. So far the 1" drop appears to be a very daily-friendly height.

Eibach recommends their camber correction kit for the rear, but post install alignment shows I'm still within spec, barely. -1.9/-1.7 degrees driver/passenger (-2.0 is max recommended). Which is great because I don't believe they've actually released the kit yet.
 

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The kit is available. I have the Sportlines and the Camber arms on order. I have seen other posts about people having the kits on their car.
 

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Crash,

Thanks for the info. I have a highly modified Chrysler 200 and it goes where I point it. In a recent trip to Florida, it took me several hours of driving my wife's EX-T to get comfortable with the steering which is twitchy. The high ratio steering is nice for city driving, but terrible out on the interstate.

In my experience, you resolved the steering with caster/camber adjustments, better suspension, shock tower bracing, front and rear frame bracing and better tires.

On my 200, the car was a handful at high speed. The worst problem was the rear end would not track and would sway side to side at high speed. In the snow, swaying would occur even at low speed. By design, the 200 track was 1" wider in the rear than the front. I suspect this was to include the convertible option to the platform. Without the convertible bracing the rear frame, the frame flexes. A simple fix for the rear was to install a trailer hitch to reduce frame flex, which in turn stabilized the rear end. This removed that feeling of the rear ends delayed transition in cornering. The weight of the trailer hitch may also help with the front to rear weight ratio. If you are performance minded, you can buy/build your own braces. I also added front wheel spacers to decrease the track difference (to retain the stock rims, ie stock look), but the right way to change the track differential would be with proper rim offset if wheel well spacing is available.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the info. I have a highly modified Chrysler 200 and it goes where I point it. In a recent trip to Florida, it took me several hours of driving my wife's EX-T to get comfortable with the steering which is twitchy. The high ratio steering is nice for city driving, but terrible out on the interstate.

By design, the 200 track was 1" wider in the rear than the front.

If you are performance minded, you can buy/build your own braces. I also added front wheel spacers to decrease the track difference (to retain the stock rims, ie stock look), but the right way to change the track differential would be with proper rim offset if wheel well spacing is available.
I'd argue "twitchy" is a harsh, but I hear ya in that it takes some getting used to. The steering has noticeably less dead space on center than any car I've owned, highway corrections are made more with pressure than actual movement of the wheel :)

It is common for cars to have a wider rear track than front (+0.6in. for our civics), probably partially for packaging reasons like you said, but a wider rear track also promotes understeer which manufacturers like for liability reasons.

I have a modified CR-Z for my weekend/autox/track car, so the changes I've made to the civic are intentionally few, low impact, and mainly cosmetic. The Pro-kit has turned out to be pretty excellent for this. I also added spacers front and rear for my summer wheels, but they are to (over)correct for the fact I'm reusing a set of Mugen wheels I bought for my Z which uses a different offset than the civic. Like you said, not ideal, but they sure do look a lot better :D
 

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Eibach Front Stabilizer 2017 Civic EX-T

I have purchased the Eibach front, rear stabilizer bars for my 2017 Honda Civic Coupe EX-T. I am looking to find anyone that has removed the front Sub-Frame from one of these for a clutch upgrade etc. I have noticed there is no brace between the right, left sides of the Sub-frame in the front underside near radiator, am being cautious because of how new the car is , don't want to bend the sub-frame. I recently did a clutch in my base 2012 Civic, there is a brace across the front of the sub-frame, worried little about it bending. Instructions from Eibach show just to let the sub-frame hang. Any insight would be well appreciated.
 

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I have purchased the Eibach front, rear stabilizer bars for my 2017 Honda Civic Coupe EX-T. I am looking to find anyone that has removed the front Sub-Frame from one of these for a clutch upgrade etc. I have noticed there is no brace between the right, left sides of the Sub-frame in the front underside near radiator, am being cautious because of how new the car is , don't want to bend the sub-frame. I recently did a clutch in my base 2012 Civic, there is a brace across the front of the sub-frame, worried little about it bending. Instructions from Eibach show just to let the sub-frame hang. Any insight would be well appreciated.

I was looking into these as well but I don't wanna mess with the subframe and all that I doubt the benefit for daily street driving is going to out weight the labor/frustration or $$$ to install.
 

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I am replacing my stabilizers because I noticed quite a lot of body roll during spirited driving over a twisty road. I also am considering some auto cross events this summer. My car isn't a SI but close it is a 2017 EX-T coupe 6-speed manual. I have so far installed the upper strut mount brace, Takeda CAI, done level 2 of CARB compliant HONDATA tune. I have a Magna Flow Exhaust sitting in a box on my porch awaiting installation by me in May. Once that is complete I will install the final level of HONDATA tune included with the CARB compliant tuner. Dyno time is scheduled for middle summer when funds available for tweaking tune for my driving style. I should see if the folks from Honda's Rally Cross team would talk to me about the sub-frame, except I believe the rally cross car is RWD or AWD. I don't have a lift to work off of so the tilt, remove steering rack method isn't going to work. Eibach instructions show installing front stabilizer this way. Just don't understand why Honda did away with the cross brace at the front of the sub-frame. I have the chassis lower bracing on order as well.
 
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