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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Edit: This site has some issues with embedding photos. There is an ongoing thread in the help section. I am working to get this fixed as quickly as possible. I have successfully published these photos elsewhere on the web. If you need immediate access, please PM me.

I'm glad to say that this install was very straight forward and fairly easy, all things considered.

You will need the following tools:
#2 Phillips head screwdriver
Medium or large flat blade screwdriver
12mm wrench
14mm wrench
10mm socket
14mm socket
3" socket extention(s)
O2 sensor socket (optional)
Breaker bar (maybe optional)
PB blaster or other penetrating lubricant. (maybe optional)

Perform the steps as follows:

Allow the engine and exhaust components to cool down. You do not want to perform this job on an engine that was just running, the exhaust components will be very hot. You can take this time to safely place the car on jack stands or ramps. As always, do NOT work under your car with it only being held up by a jack of any kind.



Remove this section of the intake.


Unclip the O2 sensor plugs and remove them from the bracket that holds them in place.


Next, remove the bracket that supports the O2 sensor clips. This is to access the rear bolts connecting the downpipe to the turbo.


Next, remove the three 12mm bolts that attach the upper heat shield to the top of the inlet of the downpipe. A flex head ratcheting wrench is nice here but probably not required.

After removing the heat shield you can then remove the two 14mm bolts and two 14mm nuts that attach the downpipe to the turbo. I sprayed them with PB blaster a few minutes beforehand and thankfully did not have any trouble with them. They are tight, I did use a breaker bar. You will want to have extensions available for your socket wrench for this part to work around components as needed.

Next, you will need to remove the tray from the bottom of the car.



Now you can unbolt the downpipe from the front pipe, as well as the two braces.



All three of the studs at the bottom of the downpipe came out instead of just the nuts. This is not really a problem but may have been avoidable had I sprayed them with PB blaster before removing them.


After that, you have everything unbolted and can carefully slide the downpipe out the bottom of the car. It's a tight fit and you will have to use the flex section of the front pipe to your advantage by sliding the forward end of the front pipe out of the way as needed.



"Here's the problem." It is one we are not fixing today unfortunately. The turbine wheel on this turbocharger is even smaller than I expected. It is not much bigger around than a quarter. The new downpipe is going to open things up but this is the next improvement we need to target.


Next we need to transfer components over from the old downpipe the new one. This heat shield is held on with a few 10mm bolts. The ability to maintain heat shields is a HUGE advantage this downpipe has over some of the other currently available options.


The best way to remove the O2 sensor is with an O2 sensor socket. However, if you do not have one you can get by with a more conventional wrench.




At this point all that is left is mounting the new downpipe and then reattaching everything you moved to get that far. "Re-assembly is the reverse of disassembly", as they say. Here is a bonus photo of the new downpipes during re-assembly.


After getting everything bolted back up I took it for a 10 mile drive, no check engine light. I will update everyone if anything changes on that end. I look forward to the power gains this new component from RV6 is going to allow me with my custom VitViper tune.
 

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Premium Member
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928 Posts
Edit: This site has some issues with embedding photos. There is an ongoing thread in the help section. I am working to get this fixed as quickly as possible. I have successfully published these photos elsewhere on the web. If you need immediate access, please PM me.

I'm glad to say that this install was very straight forward and fairly easy, all things considered.

You will need the following tools:
#2 Phillips head screwdriver
Medium or large flat blade screwdriver
12mm wrench
14mm wrench
10mm socket
14mm socket
3" socket extention(s)
O2 sensor socket (optional)
Breaker bar (maybe optional)
PB blaster or other penetrating lubricant. (maybe optional)

Perform the steps as follows:

Allow the engine and exhaust components to cool down. You do not want to perform this job on an engine that was just running, the exhaust components will be very hot. You can take this time to safely place the car on jack stands or ramps. As always, do NOT work under your car with it only being held up by a jack of any kind.



Remove this section of the intake.


Unclip the O2 sensor plugs and remove them from the bracket that holds them in place.


Next, remove the bracket that supports the O2 sensor clips. This is to access the rear bolts connecting the downpipe to the turbo.


Next, remove the three 12mm bolts that attach the upper heat shield to the top of the inlet of the downpipe. A flex head ratcheting wrench is nice here but probably not required.

After removing the heat shield you can then remove the two 14mm bolts and two 14mm nuts that attach the downpipe to the turbo. I sprayed them with PB blaster a few minutes beforehand and thankfully did not have any trouble with them. They are tight, I did use a breaker bar. You will want to have extensions available for your socket wrench for this part to work around components as needed.

Next, you will need to remove the tray from the bottom of the car.



Now you can unbolt the downpipe from the front pipe, as well as the two braces.



All three of the studs at the bottom of the downpipe came out instead of just the nuts. This is not really a problem but may have been avoidable had I sprayed them with PB blaster before removing them.


After that, you have everything unbolted and can carefully slide the downpipe out the bottom of the car. It's a tight fit and you will have to use the flex section of the front pipe to your advantage by sliding the forward end of the front pipe out of the way as needed.



"Here's the problem." It is one we are not fixing today unfortunately. The turbine wheel on this turbocharger is even smaller than I expected. It is not much bigger around than a quarter. The new downpipe is going to open things up but this is the next improvement we need to target.


Next we need to transfer components over from the old downpipe the new one. This heat shield is held on with a few 10mm bolts. The ability to maintain heat shields is a HUGE advantage this downpipe has over some of the other currently available options.


The best way to remove the O2 sensor is with an O2 sensor socket. However, if you do not have one you can get by with a more conventional wrench.




At this point all that is left is mounting the new downpipe and then reattaching everything you moved to get that far. "Re-assembly is the reverse of disassembly", as they say. Here is a bonus photo of the new downpipes during re-assembly.


After getting everything bolted back up I took it for a 10 mile drive, no check engine light. I will update everyone if anything changes on that end. I look forward to the power gains this new component from RV6 is going to allow me with my custom VitViper tune.
Thanks sir you and DCturbo have both have gotten your installed.
 

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After getting everything bolted back up I took it for a 10 mile drive, no check engine light. I will update everyone if anything changes on that end. I look forward to the power gains this new component from RV6 is going to allow me with my custom VitViper tune.
I've got an RV6 exhaust manifold on my 9th gen and have been pretty pleased with it so I'll be really interested to hear how you find yours on the 10thgen platform once its tuned

WC
 

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928 Posts
360 I PMd ya.
 
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