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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My opinion is that it is a good idea to idle and warm up a car before driving away. Seems to me it allows the metals and joints to warm, lubricate and become less brittle. Easier on the engine. To me , it's just a good practice.

What is the consensus of this community?
Thank you.
 

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My opinion is that it is a good idea to idle and warm up a car before driving away. Seems to me it allows the metals and joints to warm, lubricate and become less brittle. Easier on the engine. To me , it's just a good practice.

What is the consensus of this community?
Thank you.
I use my remote start during the winter, but when it's warm I get in and drive off no warm up
 

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Consensus? Got me.

Worst wear is when cold. By far. Warms up much slower at idle. So, after 15 seconds, 30 max, gently drive off. 30+ years in Colorado, only exceptions I made for this were when there was frost/ice/snow on the windows. Then I'd let it warm up while I dealt with that or, worst case, let it get warm enough to help with that.
 

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I live up on a hill which sidesteps the question. Just start up and roll off after maybe 10 seconds. In a couple of miles we reach level ground and we're good to go. I'm figuring the lack of stress to the drivetrain while descending allows a best warmup.

But dick w is right on. Just like your bod, warm up moving.
 

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With me, it depends on how cold. Now in the warm weather, I usually just start and go, but if it gets below 50°, I like to let my cars warm up just a bit... at least a minute or two. I think the older cars were really recommended to warm up longer, but newer cars it seems like they do not recommend it as much. I have a '15 Sonata and I think the book (owners manual) says really no more than a minute is needed, then to drive easy for the first couple of minutes. It we have really cold weather (unusually cold) below 20° (our average coldest lows here are 25°), I will let it warm for about 5-10 minutes before I leave.


I think on my 1991 Cadillac and 1990 Buick I had, it recommended the car to warm up at least for a minute or two, then drive easily until warmed up a bit.


When I had my '12 Civic, I think they recommended for the blue "cold" light to go off before driving away. It didn't have a temp gauge. :(
 

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Basically in any cold conditions all that is needed is about 30 seconds idle and then drive away easily. Like mentioned before it allows different metals to begin expansion preventing shock. It also is important to allow oil to get to every engine component. Even in warm weather I give the car about 15 seconds. Enough time to get buckled in and ready to go.
 

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Funny story, back in the early-mid 80s, there was an old lady (in her 80s then) that lived across the street from us. She would go out and start her car and immediately hold it wide open, no matter the temperature! She thought that is how you were to warm up the car. It sounded like it was about to blow. Then she would run it to about 3000 rpms and slam it in reverse and squall the tires. It was so funny to me as a kid. I remember her having a mid 70s Dodge Dart sedan, then she finally had a new early 80s Ford Fairmont sedan. That Ford sets in a storage lot that is owned by a man who was her neighbor... it has been in there for years. She passed away years ago and he just got the car in the estate sale and he was/is the type to never sell anything he gets. I imagine the engine and tranny are toast. :O
 

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Gentle moving warm up in modern vehicles. Generally let it idle about 15 seconds before driving off. The type of oil you use is much more important than letting it idle. Synthetic oils remain at low viscosity even when cold, so they are sucked up from oil pan much more quickly, reducing time of unlubricated metal on metal contact, which causes most wear.
 

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Modern fuel injection is a lot more efficient than what it used to. Only reason you need to idle the car is to give it 30 seconds to get the oil circulating. In the winter, I let the car warm up more for the interior temperature than anything else. It's so cold running from a warm house only to sit your bum on a frozen seat.
 

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As most everyone here has already said, warming up a car engine is no longer recommended by the manufacturers and hasn't been for many years now. Simply start the vehicle and take it easy until it's warmed up.

The only real thing that warming up the engine at idle does for you nowadays is to waste fuel.
 

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Regardless of what some may say, it's been proven that oils flow slower when cold, thus, increasing wear. In cold days, I let my car about 10 minutes to warm up while I drink my coffee inside the house.
 

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Regardless of what some may say, it's been proven that oils flow slower when cold, thus, increasing wear. In cold days, I let my car about 10 minutes to warm up while I drink my coffee inside the house.
So with that logic why not wait another 10 minutes and let it get up to operating temperature? ;)

10 minutes is a bit over the top, and might actually do damage such as Carbon build up. Unless you are doing a 0-60 run as soon as you put it in drive, a minute or two is more than enough.
 

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So with that logic why not wait another 10 minutes and let it get up to operating temperature? ;)

10 minutes is a bit over the top, and might actually do damage such as Carbon build up. Unless you are doing a 0-60 run as soon as you put it in drive, a minute or two is more than enough.
I'm not saying you need to warm it up for 10 minutes. I said I leave my car warm up for 10 minutes so that it's nice and warm when I get in. Plus I drink my coffee in peace. Sure, 2-3 is good enough to drive off. Give it time to warm the engine and fluids a bit. Driving straight off in single or negative digits isn't very bright.
 

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I'm not saying you need to warm it up for 10 minutes. I said I leave my car warm up for 10 minutes so that it's nice and warm when I get in. Plus I drink my coffee in peace. Sure, 2-3 is good enough to drive off. Give it time to warm the engine and fluids a bit. Driving straight off in single or negative digits isn't very bright.
Isn't this what multi-viscosity oils are all about? And does this mean that the manufacturer's aren't very bright because they advise you to drive off gently after starting the vehicle?
 

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Isn't this what multi-viscosity oils are all about? And does this mean that the manufacturer's aren't very bright because they advise you to drive off gently after starting the vehicle?
What I'm saying is that a warm car is better than a cold car.
 

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I'd rather have a cold car than a car with a bunch of carbon build up due to excessive idling. Also not very good for the environment. :crying:
Same here, rather bring a plug in heater if I must, or some candles to help speed up heating LOL
 

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That's only with excessive heating like 10 minutes. 1 minute or two should be good enough for the newer generation of cars. It's just a leftover habit from carbureted engines in ye olde days.
 

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in the canada winter time I start the engine wait 3-5 minutes minimum sometimes weather is minus 35 degrees around and I wait 10 minutes.
 
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